Alien Contact in Puerto Rico?

Shortly before the dawning of the 1960s, a historic document, with the title of Searching for Interstellar Communications, was prepared by Phillip Morrison and Giuseppe Conconi, a pair of physicists at Cornell University, and which was published within the prestigious pages of Nature. Its focus: the potential feasibility of seeking out alien life via high-powered microwaves.

It was a paper that received a great deal of interest, particularly so from a man named Frank Drake, who chose to turn the theories of Morrison and Conconi into reality at the Green Bank National Radio Astronomy Observatory, in West Virginia.

In October 1961, a conference of what became known as the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) was held at Green Bank, and Drake proved to be the stand-out character, when he revealed to the audience what has famously become known as the Drake Equation – a theoretical means to try and determine the number of intelligent, alien cultures that might exist in the known universe.

Radio-telescope-570x294When Frank Drake chose to focus his work on a quest for extraterrestrial life, it was a decision that ultimately took him to none other than Puerto Rico and its now-famous Arecibo Radio Telescope, of which Drake ultimately rose to the rank of director.

All of which brings us to a new, breaking story just now shared with me by good friend Joshua P. Warren, who is currently on Puerto Rico.

Josh says: “An independent group of researchers in Puerto Rico believe they possibly made contact with ‘beings from elsewhere’ last Friday, August 15, 2014, 37th anniversary of the mysterious ‘WOW! Signal’ captured by SETI.”

The “Arecibo Project,” led by Joshua P. Warren, Director of the Bermuda Triangle Research Base, spent the day transmitting radio messages into outer space from Arecibo, Lajas, and other parts of the island, asking ET to appear around certain GPS coordinates as a live webcam streamed footage of the general location.

A variety of anomalies were captured on camera, including a “saucer-shaped object” that appeared and which then shot straight up into the sky, accompanied by a strange, high-pitched tone.

Warren’s team compared that tone to the famed WOW! Signal, and say it is so similar they think the UFO possibly sent this signal to them as a sign of successful communication.

“We believe the UFO may have sent us the same type of signal that came from space, and was recorded by SETI, 37 years ago,” says Josh. He adds: “This was a complete surprise. Though it was picked up via a webcam microphone, and not a broad dish like SETI had, our analysis thus far has shown it is essentially a demodulated signal from the WOW! transmission turned into audio.”

The message sent into space, an invitation for contact, was recorded by George Noory, host of “Coast to Coast AM” the largest overnight radio program in North America.

Depositphotos_4516846_s-570x379Live footage was being analyzed in Washington DC at the studio of filmmaker C. Eric Scott, while audio was being processed at a lab in North Carolina. The researchers are asking for others with expertise to analyze the UFO images and compare the audio themselves. Data is freely posted at: www.AreciboProject.com

When asked for his opinion of what the “beings” may be, Warren said:

“After my 7 years of research here, the accumulating evidence suggests we may be dealing with a new form of life in Puerto Rico. Sometimes huge, and sometimes small drones, I believe these beings could be a highly-advanced, extremely sleek and efficient organic/electronic hybrid. They have probably evolved much longer than humans, and are now capable of inter-stellar and inter-dimensional travel, seeming to pop in and out of our visible dimensions almost instantly.

“Hundreds of years of native lore, combined with our modern research, indicate they might be sensitive to human thought, often engaging in contact when a highly-focused human, or group of humans, telepathically projects a desire to interact with them. We don’t know their ultimate agenda, but if it were detrimental to humans, we’d likely have been harmed by now.”

Source: Mysteriousuniverse

 

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Kola Kenda: Sri Lanka’s Energy Dish

For the readers who follow Mystica’s “Better Life” category, here comes a dish from Sri Lanka with a lot of benefits for your health and life energy. We were notified of this dish by a Sri Lankan member of our open think tank and found the information worth to be made available to a broader audience.

We’re talking about Kola Kenda, a herbal soup made of indigenous leaves, local rice and water, sometimes coconut. Some of the indigenous leaves used to make this porridge are Gotu Kola (Centella asiatica), sessile joyweed (Alternanthera sessilis), known as mukunuwenna in Sri Lanka, or Haathawariya (Asparagus recemosus). However, any type of edible, dark green leaves can be used.

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Other types of plants used: Welpenela [Cardiospermum Halicacabum (Sapindaceae)], Aubergene (Elabatu), Polpala (Aerva lanata), Avacado

Dark green leaves provide fibre, calcium, vitamin K, iron and even folic acid. Many Sri Lankans prefer to eat leaf porridge on an empty stomach at breakfast.

Health benefits of leaf porridge:

– Treats fatigue, constipation, high blood pressure
– Enhances digestive functions
– Reduces cholesterol
– Prevents cancer and heart diseases.
– Enhances the immune system and helps maintain bones and teeth, as well as reduces inflammation.

The website ceyherbal.com, from which some of the information here has been extracted, proposes the following recipe, adding that “leaf porridge can be made using any number of edible, local dark green leaves”:

Select the type of leaves you wish to use
Boil rice (you can use about 1-2 cups) and transfer this rich into a large container
Pour fresh coconut milk from scraped coconut or coconut milk from tins into the rice (1 tin)
Add salt to your liking.
Blend the leaves (about two handfuls) and a one cup of water in a food processor or blender.
Add the blended leaf mixture into the container with the rice, salt and coconut milk.
Feel free to add more water or coconut milk according to your preference.
Bring ingredients to a boil for about 5 minutes.

More recipes with slight variations to match your personal taste can be found browsing “Kola Kenda”. There seem to be many more options of preparation.

 

 

Gigantic Ocean Vortices Seen From Space Could Change Climate Models

By  – 06.26.14

The weather is a dance between an odd couple: the frantic atmosphere and the staid sea. The atmosphere changes quickly, as when a strong wind suddenly starts to blow or a cyclone careens ashore. The ocean seems more sedate. Its wide gyres trace the edges of continents, carrying sun-warmed water from the equator out towards the poles. Even the rough storms that terrorize sailors are more the sky’s fault than the sea’s. The waves that toss a ship are whipped up by the wind.

But it turns out that the ocean makes its own gestures; it just makes them very slowly. Enormous vortices of water, measuring 60 miles across, spin their way across the sea at a deliberate pace—3 miles per day. Oceanographers have dubbed them mesoscale eddies for their middle size, larger than a wake formed by an aircraft carrier and smaller than a gyre. Each one is like an upside down mountain of water, held together by its own rotation and extending about 3,000 feet beneath the surface. In the video above, eddies show up as red and blue dots dancing around. (Red ones spin clockwise, blue ones counterclockwise.) Just how much water gets carried around by all these eddies? The total is staggering: more than 30 times the amount dumped by all the world’s rivers into the ocean, according to a paper published today in Science. Other stuff gets caught in the vortices and taken along for the ride. This huge network of eddies may be shipping packets of pollutants, organic nutrients, and dissolved carbon all around the world.

These eddies are almost invisible unless you look from space. For decades, oceanographers have been tracking eddies using NASA satellites. By bouncing a pulse of radar off the surface of the water and recording the time it takes to return, the satellites can measure their distance from the water to within less than an inch. This astounding accuracy turns out to be necessary, since unlike the deep ship-swallowing whirlpools of Greek mythology, the depression at the center of an eddy is a mere 20 inches.

Enormous ocean eddies are measured using satellites (height map, top layer) and submersibles (vorticity map, bottom layers). Ocean University of China

Enormous ocean eddies are measured using satellites (height map, top layer) and submersibles (vorticity map, bottom layers).
Ocean University of China

To reconstruct the 3-D structure of the eddies and find their volume, a team of oceanographers led by Bo Qiu of the University of Hawaii used data from underwater floats. More than 3,000 ARGO submersibles are scattered around the globe, lurking under the surface. Each comes to the surface every 10 days to report the water temperature, salt content, density, and velocity. An eddy, once born, might travel for months or years before dissipating. By combining a decade of satellite and submersible data, the researchers were able to track the incredible mass of water collectively moved by eddies across the entire world. Qiu’s calculations surprised even him.

“We didn’t expect the number to be that high,” he said. “We know they propagate westward, and there are a lot of eddies. But the mass… there’s an order of magnitude more than we expected.”

Previously, it was thought that the steady currents like the Gulf Stream were almost entirely responsible for moving stuff through the ocean. The ocean transports trash, nutrients, radioactive waste, dissolved carbon dioxide and heat all around the world, and the latter two are especially important for understanding climate change. Qiu’s study raises the possibility that eddies also make a substantial contribution to these transports.

This paper will kick off a wave of research among climate modelers, says Ryan Abernathey, who studies the impact of ocean circulation on climate at Columbia University.  “The volume estimate is really surprising,” he said. “This is an important effect. The next question is how leaky the eddy is.” The eddy is made of water, after all, and the difference between inside and outside is not precise. If, say, the dissolved carbon caught in an eddy slowly slips out, then after a year of meandering an eddy may have left its original contents an ocean away. But if the eddies hold their cargo tightly, they might be shipping enormous packages of carbon, salt, and pollutants from Australia to Africa and from Europe to America. Scientists are now trying to figure out how the packages effect local ecosystems and the planet’s climate.

 

Originally posted on: Wired.com